d10q.htm




UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)

/x/
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended December 27, 2009

OR

/ /
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                             to                             .

Commission File No. 0-12695

INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
 
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

DELAWARE
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
94-2669985
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
6024 SILVER CREEK VALLEY ROAD, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
 
95138
(Zip Code)


Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code: (408) 284-8200

     
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
     
Common stock, $.001 par value
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ý No ¨  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes ¨    No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
x  Large accelerated filer                            ¨  Accelerated filer                            ¨  Non-accelerated filer              ¨ Smaller reporting company

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes ¨ No ý
 
The number of outstanding shares of the registrant's Common Stock, $.001 par value per share, as of January 24, 2010, was approximately 165,749,102.



INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q FOR THE PERIOD ENDED DECEMBER 27, 2009
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION


Item 1.
     
      4  
      5  
      6  
      7  
Item 2.
    37  
Item 3.
    47  
Item 4.
    48  
           
PART II—OTHER INFORMATION
 
           
Item 1.
    48  
Item 1A.
    50  
Item 2.
    58  
Item 3.
    59  
Item 4.
    59  
Item 5.
    59  
Item 6.
    59  
    59  




PART I    FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(UNAUDITED; IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
   
Dec. 27,
 2009
   
Dec. 28,
 2008
   
Dec. 27,
 2009
   
Dec. 28,
 2008
 
Revenues
  $ 142,480     $ 167,079     $ 397,938     $ 555,828  
Cost of revenues
    82,751       97,410       239,913       314,547  
                                 
Gross profit
    59,729       69,669       158,025       241,281  
                                 
Operating expenses:
 
                               
Research and development
    38,316       37,247       116,086       122,398  
Selling, general and administrative
    24,754       30,879       80,851       96,055  
Acquired in-process research and development
    --       5,597       --       5,597  
Goodwill and acquisition-related intangible assets impairment
    --       339,051       --       339,051  
                                 
Total operating expenses
    63,070       412,774       196,937       563,101  
                                 
Operating loss
    (3,341 )     (343,105 )     (38,912 )     (321,820 )
                                 
Gain (loss) on divestiture
    (4,461 )     --       78,286       --  
Other-than-temporary impairment loss on investments
    --       (3,000 )     --       (3,000 )
Interest income and other (expense), net
    597       (1,150 )     3,221       699  
Interest expense
    (15 )     (14 )     (45 )     (47
                                 
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (7,220 )     (347,269 )     42,550       (324,168
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    147       (2,010 )     3,498       262  
                                 
Net income (loss)
  $ (7,367 )   $ (345,259 )   $ 39,052     $ (324,430 )
                                 
Basic net income (loss) per share
  $ (0.04 )   $ (2.06 )   $ 0.24     $ (1.92 )
Diluted net income (loss) per share
  $ (0.04 )   $ (2.06 )   $ 0.24     $ (1.92 )
                                 
Weighted average shares:
                               
Basic
    165,954       167,412       165,658       169,354  
Diluted
    165,954       167,412       166,114       169,354  
                                 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(UNAUDITED; IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)

 
Dec. 27,
2009
 
Mar. 29,
2009
 
Assets
           
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 188,715     $ 136,036  
Short-term investments
    190,057       160,037  
Accounts receivable
    61,065       54,894  
Inventories
    49,343       69,722  
Deferred tax assets
    1,696       1,696  
Prepayments and other current assets
    22,765       19,881  
                 
Total current assets
    513,641       442,266  
                 
Property, plant and equipment, net
    69,407       71,561  
Goodwill
    101,184       89,404  
Acquisition-related intangibles, net
    50,882       50,509  
Other assets
    24,986       24,627  
                 
Total assets
  $ 760,100     $ 678,367  
                 
Liabilities and stockholders' equity
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 32,224     $ 25,837  
Accrued compensation and related expenses
    15,940       18,820  
Deferred income on shipments to distributors
    19,505       16,538  
Income taxes payable
    3,080       457  
Other accrued liabilities
    27,647       21,206  
                 
Total current liabilities
    98,396       82,858  
                 
Deferred tax liabilities
    3,467       3,220  
Long-term income tax payable
    21,066       20,907  
Other long-term obligations
    25,778       14,314  
Total liabilities
    148,707       121,299  
                 
Commitments and contingencies (Notes 16 and 17)
               
Stockholders' equity:
               
Preferred stock; $.001 par value: 10,000 shares authorized; no shares issued
    --       --  
Common stock; $.001 par value: 350,000 shares authorized; 165,983 and 165,298 shares outstanding at December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009, respectively
    166       165  
Additional paid-in capital
    2,301,362       2,283,601  
Treasury stock; at cost:  58,310 shares and 57,752 shares at December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009, respectively
    (781,190 )     (777,847 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    1,724       870  
Accumulated deficit
    (910,669 )     (949,721
                 
Total stockholders' equity
    611,393       557,068  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
  $ 760,100     $ 678,367  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(UNAUDITED; IN THOUSANDS)
 
Nine months ended
 
 
Dec. 27,
2009
 
Dec. 28
2008
 
Cash flows provided by operating activities:
           
Net income (loss)
  $ 39,052     $ (324,430 )
Adjustments:
               
Depreciation
    17,348       19,880  
Amortization of intangible assets
    16,130       61,103  
Goodwill and acquisition-related intangible assets impairment
    --       339,051  
Acquired in-process research and development
    --       5,597  
Other-than-temporary impairment loss on investments
    --       3,000  
Gain from divestitures
    (78,286 )     --  
Stock-based compensation expense, net of amounts capitalized in inventory
    12,341       25,783  
Assets impairment
    1,853       --  
Deferred tax provision
    247       (100 )
Changes in assets and liabilities (net of effects of acquisitions and divestitures):
               
Accounts receivable, net
    (5,934 )     18,061  
Inventories
    27,560       3,060  
Prepayments and other assets
    4,447       10,200  
Accounts payable
    6,178       (2,727 )
Accrued compensation and related expenses
    (4,260 )     (7,199 )
Deferred income on shipments to distributors
    621       (4,051 ))
Income taxes payable and receivable
    3,073       3,929  
Other accrued liabilities and long term liabilities
    4,792       (3,181 )
                 
Net cash provided by operating activities
    45,162       147,976  
                 
Cash flows provided by (used for) investing activities
               
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (64,482 )     (20,097 )
Proceeds from divestitures
    109,434       --  
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
    (9,885 )     (12,867 )
Purchases of short-term investments
    (208,836 )     (141,475 )
Proceeds from sales of short-term investments
    130,254       18,199  
Proceeds from maturities of short-term investments
    48,595       117,359  
                 
Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities
    5,080       (38,881 )
                 
Cash flows provided by (used for) financing activities
               
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
    4,858       11,147  
Repurchase of common stock
    (3,343 )     (62,338 )
Excess tax benefit from share based payment arrangements
    --       192  
                 
Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities
    1,515       (50,999 )
                 
Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents 
    922       (1,866 )
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    52,679       56,230  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    136,036       131,986  
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 188,715     $ 188,216  
                 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities
               
Common stock options assumed in connection with Tundra acquisition
  $ 721     $ --  
                 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(UNAUDITED)

Note 1
Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (“IDT” or the “Company”) contain all adjustments that are, in the opinion of management, necessary to state fairly the interim financial information included therein.  The year-end condensed balance sheet data was derived from audited financial statements, but does not include all disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the Company’s financial statements and the accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 29, 2009.  Operating results for the three months and nine months ended December 27, 2009 are not necessarily indicative of operating results for an entire fiscal year.

In accordance with authoritative guidance for subsequent events, the Company has evaluated the period from December 27, 2009, the date of the financial statements, through February 4, 2010, the date of the issuance of the financial statements and the date of the filing of this Form 10-Q for subsequent events.

Note 2
Significant Accounting Policies

Investments:

Available-for-Sale Investments.  Investments designated as available-for-sale include marketable debt and equity securities.  Available-for-sale investments are classified as short-term, as these investments generally consist of highly marketable securities that are intended to be available to meet near-term cash requirements.  Marketable securities classified as available-for-sale are reported at market value, with net unrealized gains or losses recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income, a separate component of stockholders' equity, until realized.  Realized gains and losses on investments are computed based upon specific identification and are included in interest income and other (expense), net.

Trading Securities.  Trading securities are stated at fair value, with gains or losses resulting from changes in fair value recognized currently in earnings. The Company elects to classify as “trading” assets a portion of its marketable equity securities, which are contained in the “Other assets” line item in the non-current section of the Consolidated Balance Sheets. These investments consist exclusively of a marketable equity portfolio held to generate returns that seek to offset changes in liabilities related to certain deferred compensation arrangements. Gains or losses from changes in the fair value of these equity securities are recorded as non-operating earnings which are offset by losses or gains on the related liabilities recorded as compensation expense.

Non-Marketable Equity Securities.  Non-marketable equity securities are accounted for at historical cost or, if the Company has significant influence over the investee, using the equity method of accounting.



Other-Than-Temporary Impairment.  All of the Company’s available-for-sale investments and non-marketable equity securities are subject to a periodic impairment review.  Investments are considered to be impaired when a decline in fair value is judged to be other-than-temporary.  This determination requires significant judgment.  For publicly traded investments, impairment is determined based upon the specific facts and circumstances present at the time, including a review of the closing price over the previous six months, general market conditions and the Company’s intent and ability to hold the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for recovery.  For non-marketable equity securities, the impairment analysis requires the identification of events or circumstances that would likely have a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the investment, including revenue and earnings trends, overall business prospects and general market conditions in the investees’ industry or geographic area.  Investments identified as having an indicator of impairment are subject to further analysis to determine if the investment is other-than-temporarily impaired, in which case the investment is written down to its impaired value.

Concentrations of credit Risk.    Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to a significant concentration of credit risk consist of cash, cash equivalents, short term investments, and trade accounts receivable.  The Company invests its excess funds primarily in checking, money market funds, United States government treasuries and agency securities, corporate bonds and corporate commercial paper with reputable major financial institutions.

The Company sells integrated circuits primarily in the U.S., Europe and Asia. The Company monitors the financial condition of its major customers, including performing credit evaluations of those accounts which management considers to be high risk, and generally does not require collateral from its customers. When deemed necessary, the Company may limit the credit extended to certain customers. The Company’s relationship with the customer, and the customer’s past and current payment experience, are also factored into the evaluation in instances where limited financial information is available. The Company maintains and reviews its allowance for doubtful accounts by considering factors such as historical bad debts, age of the account receivable balances, customer credit-worthiness and current economic conditions that may affect a customer’s ability to pay.

The Company utilizes a relatively small number of global and regional distributors around the world, who buy product directly from the Company on behalf of their customers.  One family of distributors, Maxtek and its affiliates, represented approximately 20% and 21% of  the Company’s revenues for the three and nine months ended December 27, 2009, respectively, and 18% and 22% of the Company’s revenues for the three and nine months ended December 28, 2008, respectively. At December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009, Maxtek and its affiliates, represented approximately 25% and 21%of the Company’s gross accounts receivable, respectively.

Inventories.   Inventories are recorded at the lower of standard cost (which approximates actual cost on a first-in, first-out basis) or market value.  Inventory held at consignment locations is included in finished goods inventory as the Company retains full title and rights to the product.  Inventory valuation include provisions for obsolete and excess inventory based on management’s forecasts of demand over specific future time horizons and reserves to value the Company’s inventory at the lower of cost or market which rely on forecasts of average selling prices (ASPs) in future periods.

Revenue Recognition.  The Company’s revenue results from semiconductors sold through three channels: direct sales to original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) and electronic manufacturing service providers (“EMSs”), consignment sales to OEMs and EMSs, and sales through distributors.   The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, the price is fixed or determinable, and its ability to collect is reasonably assured.

For distributors in North America and Europe regions, who have stock rotation, price protection and ship from stock pricing adjustment rights, the Company defers revenue and related cost of revenues on sales to these distributors until the product is sold through by the distributor to an end-customer.  Subsequent to shipment to the distributor, the Company may reduce product pricing through price protection based on market conditions, competitive considerations and other factors.  Price protection is granted to distributors


on the inventory that they have on hand at the date the price protection is offered.  The Company also grants certain credits to its distributors on specifically identified portions of the distributors’ business to allow them to earn a competitive gross margin on the sale of the Company’s products to their end customers.  As a result of its inability to estimate these credits, the Company has determined that the sales price to these distributors is not fixed or determinable until the final sale to the end-customer.

In the Asia Pacific (“APAC”) and Japan regions, the Company has distributors for which revenue is recognized upon shipment, with reserves recorded for the estimated return and pricing adjustment exposures.   The determination of the amount of reserves to be recorded for stock rotation rights requires the Company to make estimates as to the amount of product which will be returned by customers within their limited contractual rights.  The Company utilizes historical return rates to estimate the exposure in accordance with authoritative guidance for Revenue Recognition When Right of Return Exists. In addition, from time-to-time, the Company can offer pricing adjustments to distributors for product purchased in a given quarter that remains in their inventory.  These amounts are estimated by management based on discussions with customers, assessment of market trends, as well as historical practice.  

Based on the terms in the agreements with its distributors and the application of this policy, the Company recognizes revenue once the distributor sells our products to an end-customer for North American and European distributors and recognizes revenue upon shipment to Japanese and other Asian distributors.

Stock-based Compensation. The fair value of employee restricted stock units is equal to the market value of the Company’s common stock on the date the award is granted.  The Company estimates the fair value of employee stock options and the right to purchase shares under the employee stock purchase plan using the Black-Scholes valuation model, consistent with the Financial Accounting Standard Board's (FASB) authoritative guidance for share-based payments.  Option-pricing models require the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected term of options and the expected price volatility of the stock underlying such options.  In addition, the Company is required to estimate the number of stock-based awards that will be forfeited due to employee turnover.  The Company attributes the value of stock-based compensation to expense on an accelerated method.  Finally, the Company capitalizes into inventory a portion of the periodic stock-based compensation expense that relates to employees working in manufacturing activities.

The Company updates the expected term of stock option grants annually based on its analysis of the stock option exercise behavior over a period of time.  The interest rate is based on the average U.S. Treasury interest rate over the expected term during the applicable quarter.  The Company believes that the implied volatility of its common stock is an important consideration of overall market conditions and a good indicator of the expected volatility of its common stock.  However, due to the limited volume of options freely traded over the counter, the Company believes that implied volatility, by itself, is not representative of the expected volatility of its common stock.  Therefore, upon the adoption of FASB authoritative guidance for stock-based payment at the beginning of fiscal 2007, the Company revised the volatility factor used to estimate the fair value of its stock-based awards which now reflects a blend of historical volatility of its common stock and implied volatility of call options and dealer quotes on call options, generally having a term of less than twelve months.  The Company has not paid, nor does it have current plans to pay dividends on its common stock in the foreseeable future.

Income Taxes.  The Company accounts for income taxes under an asset and liability approach that requires the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between book and tax bases of assets and liabilities be recognized as deferred tax assets and liabilities. Generally accepted accounting principles require the Company to evaluate the ability to realize the value of its net deferred tax assets on an ongoing basis. A valuation allowance is recorded to reduce the net deferred tax assets to an amount that will more likely than not be realized. Accordingly, the Company considers various tax planning strategies, forecasts of future taxable income and its most recent operating results in assessing the need for a valuation allowance. In consideration of the ability to realize the value of net deferred tax assets, recent results must be given substantially more weight than any projections of future profitability. Since the fourth quarter of fiscal 2003, the Company has determined that, under applicable accounting principles, it could not conclude that it was more likely than not that the Company would realize the value of its net deferred tax assets. The Company’s assumptions regarding the ultimate realization of these assets remained


unchanged in the third quarter of fiscal 2010 and accordingly, the Company continues to record a valuation allowance to reduce its deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized.

On April 2, 2007, the Company adopted FASB authoritative guidance which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. This interpretation prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. As a result of the implementation of this guidance, the Company recognizes the tax liability for uncertain income tax positions on the income tax return based on the two-step process prescribed in the interpretation. The first step is to determine whether it is more likely than not that each income tax position would be sustained upon audit. The second step is to estimate and measure the tax benefit as the amount that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the tax authority. Estimating these amounts requires the Company to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. The Company evaluates these uncertain tax positions on a quarterly basis. This evaluation is based on the consideration of several factors including changes in facts or circumstances, changes in applicable tax law, settlement of issues under audit, and new exposures. If the Company later determines that the exposure is lower or that the liability is not sufficient to cover its revised expectations, the Company adjusts the liability and effect a related change in its tax provision during the period in which the Company makes such determination.

Note 3
Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2009, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“Codification”). This authoritative guidance establishes the Codification, which officially launched on July 1, 2009, that is now the source of authoritative U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) recognized by the FASB to be applied by nongovernmental entities. Rules and interpretive releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under authority of federal securities laws are also sources of authoritative U.S. GAAP for SEC registrants. The subsequent issuances of new standards will be in the form of Accounting Standards Updates that will be included in the Codification. Generally, the Codification is not expected to change U.S. GAAP. All other accounting literature excluded from the Codification will be considered non-authoritative. This guidance is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009. The Company adopted this guidance in the second quarter of fiscal 2010. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements or related footnotes.

In May 2009, the FASB issued accounting guidance for subsequent events, which establishes general standards of accounting for and disclosure of events that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued or are available to be issued. This guidance sets forth the circumstances under which an entity should recognize events or transactions occurring after the balance sheet date in its financial statements. This guidance also requires the disclosure of the date through which an entity has evaluated subsequent events and the basis for that date—that is, whether that date represents the date the financial statements were issued or were available to be issued. This guidance is effective for interim or annual reporting periods ending after June 15, 2009. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements or related footnotes.

In April 2009, the FASB issued authoritative fair value disclosure guidance for financial instruments. This guidance requires an entity to provide interim disclosures about the fair value of all financial instruments as well as in annual financial statements.  Additionally, this guidance requires disclosures of the methods and significant assumptions used in estimating the fair value of financial instruments on an interim basis as well as changes of the methods and significant assumptions from prior periods. This guidance is effective for interim and annual periods ending after June 15, 2009. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.


In April 2009, the FASB issued authoritative guidance for determining fair value when the volume and level of activity for the asset or liability have significantly decreased and identifying transactions that are not orderly. This standard provides guidance on how to determine the fair value of assets and liabilities. The guidance relates to determining fair values when there is no active market or where the price inputs being used represent distressed sales. It reaffirms that the objective of fair value measurement––to reflect how much an asset would be sold for in an orderly transaction (as opposed to a distressed forced transaction) at the date of the financial statements under current market conditions. Specifically, it reaffirms the need to use judgment to ascertain if a formerly active market has become inactive and in determining fair values when markets have become inactive. The guidance is effective for interim and fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2009. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In April 2009, the FASB amended the existing guidance on accounting for assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination that arise from contingencies, including the initial recognition and measurement, subsequent measurement and accounting and disclosures for assets and liabilities arising from contingencies in business combinations. This guidance is effective for contingent assets and contingent liabilities acquired in business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the fiscal year beginning after December 15, 2008. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010.  See Note 11 – “Business Combinations” in Part I, Item 1 for further discussion.

 In April 2009, the FASB amended the existing guidance on determining whether an impairment for investments in debt securities is other-than-temporary.  This guidance does not amend existing recognition and measurement guidance related to other-than-temporary impairments of equity securities. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and the adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In June 2008, the FASB issued the authoritative guidance for determining whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities.  This guidance states that unvested share-based payment awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents (whether paid or unpaid) are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of earnings per share pursuant to the two-class method. This guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and the adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In April 2008, the FASB amended the existing guidance on determination of the useful life of intangible assets. This guidance amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset. The intent of the guidance is to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible asset and the period of expected cash flows used to measure the fair value of the intangible asset. This guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010.

In February 2008, the FASB amended the existing guidance on fair value measurements for purposes of lease classification to remove certain leasing transactions from its scope and was effective upon issuance. In addition, FASB issued authoritative guidance that provided a one year deferral for application of the new fair value measurement principles for all non-financial assets and non-financial liabilities, except for items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually), until the beginning of the first quarter of fiscal 2010. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal year 2010.  In October 2008, the FASB issued authoritative guidance on determining the fair value of a financial asset when the market for that asset is not active. This guidance was effective upon issuance. The adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.


In December 2007, the FASB revised the authoritative guidance for business combinations. The guidance changes the accounting for business combinations including the measurement of acquirer shares issued in consideration for a business combination, the recognition of contingent consideration, the accounting for pre-acquisition gain and loss contingencies, the recognition of capitalized in-process research and development, the accounting for acquisition-related restructuring cost accruals, the treatment of acquisition related transaction costs and the recognition of changes in the acquirer’s income tax valuation allowance. This guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, with early adoption prohibited. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010.  See Note 11 – “Business Combinations” in Part I, Item 1 for further discussion.

Note 4
Net Income (Loss) Per Share

Net income (loss) per share has been computed using weighted-average common shares outstanding.

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
 (in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
 
Net income (loss)
  $ (7,367 )   $ (345,259 )   $ 39,052     $ (324,430 )
                                 
Weighted average common shares outstanding
    165,954       167,412       165,658       169,354  
Dilutive effect of employee stock options and restricted stock units
    --       --       456       --  
Weighted average common shares outstanding, assuming dilution
    165,954       167,412       166,114       169,354  
Basic net income (loss) per share
  $ (0.04 )   $ (2.06 )   $ 0.24     $ (1.92 )
Diluted net income (loss) per share
  $ (0.04 )   $ (2.06 )   $ 0.24     $ (1.92 )

Stock options to purchase 24.9 million shares and 28.3 million shares for the three and nine month periods ended December 27, 2009, respectively, and 29.0 million and 29.6 million for the three and nine month periods ended December 28, 2008, respectively, were outstanding, but were excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share because the exercise price of the stock options was greater than the average share price of the common shares and therefore, the effect would have been anti-dilutive. In addition, unvested restricted stock units of less than 0.1 million for the three and nine months ended December 27, 2009, respectively,  and 1.2 million and 0.6 million for the three and nine months ended December 28, 2008, respectively, were excluded from the calculation because they were anti-dilutive after considering unrecognized stock-based compensation expense.  Net loss per share for the three month period ended December 27, 2009 and three month and nine month periods ended December 28, 2008, respectively, were based only on weighted average common shares outstanding.



Note 5
Stock-Based Employee Compensation

Compensation Expense

The following table summarizes stock-based compensation expense by line items appearing in the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations:

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
 (in thousands)
 
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
 
Cost of revenue
  $ 630     $ 787     $ 2,250     $ 2,756  
Research and development
    2,246       5,101       7,921       15,402  
Selling, general and administrative
    1,287       3,124       2,170       7,625  
Total stock-based compensation expense
    4,163       9,012       12,341       25,783  
Tax effect on stock-based compensation expense (1)
    --       --       --       --  
Total stock-based compensation expense, net of related tax effects
  $ 4,163     $ 9,012     $ 12,341     $ 25,783  

(1)  
Assumes a zero tax rate for each period presented as the Company has a full valuation allowance for its deferred tax assets.

Stock-based compensation expense recognized in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations is based on awards ultimately expected to vest.  The authoritative guidance for stock-based compensation requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. In the second quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company changed the way in which it determines and applies its forfeiture estimates, and as a result, reduced its compensation expense by $1.5 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2010.  The change is not expected to have a significant impact on future periods' stock-based compensation expense. The Company attributes the value of stock-based compensation to expense on an accelerated method.

The following table summarizes stock-based compensation expense associated with each type of award:

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
 (in thousands)
 
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
 
Employee stock options
  $ 2,201     $ 6,675     $ 7,189     $ 19,118  
Employee stock purchase plan (“ESPP”)
    679       684       1,397       2,188  
Restricted stock units (“RSUs”)
    1,122       1,839       3,597       4,599  
Change in amounts capitalized in inventory
    161       (186 )     158       (122 )
Total stock-based compensation expense
  $ 4,163     $ 9,012     $ 12,341     $ 25,783  

On March 29, 2009, the Company’s 1984 Employee Stock Purchase plan expired.  No stock was issued under the employee stock purchase plan in the first quarter of fiscal 2010.  In the second and third quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company issued 0.4 million and 0.5 million shares of common stock under its 2009 Employee Stock Purchase plan.



Valuation Assumptions

Assumptions used in the Black-Scholes valuation model and resulting weighted average grant-date fair values were as follows:

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
 
Stock option plans:
                       
     Expected Term
 
4.58 years
   
4.67 years
   
4.66 years
   
4.59 years
 
     Risk-free interest rate
    2.17 %     2.12 %     2.13 %     2.79 %
     Volatility
    42.5 %     49.1 %     45.4 %     41.7 %
     Dividend Yield
    0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %
     Weighted average grant-date fair value
  $ 2.30     $ 2.26     $ 2.17     $ 3.81  
ESPP:
                               
     Expected Term
 
0.25 years
   
0.25 years
   
0.25 years
   
0.25 years
 
     Risk-free interest rate
    0.1 %     0.94 %     0.2 %     1.39 %
     Volatility
    35.4 %     55.7 %     48.5 %     42.3 %
     Dividend Yield
    0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %
     Weighted average fair value
  $ 1.46     $ 2.21     $ 1.55     $ 2.09  

On September 17, 2009, at the 2009 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, the Company’s stockholders approved a one-time stock option exchange program (“option exchange”) for the employees other than members of its Board of Directors and executive officers subject to the provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act, which allowed employees to surrender certain outstanding stock options for cancellation in exchange for the grant of new replacement options to purchase a lesser number of shares having an exercise price equal to the fair market value of the Company’s common stock on the replacement grant date.

On October 30, 2009, the Company completed an offer to exchange certain options to purchase shares of its common stock, par value $0.001 per share.  A total of 992 eligible employees participated in the option exchange. Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the option exchange, the Company accepted for exchange options totaling 9,992,195, representing 61% of the total number of options eligible for exchange. All surrendered options were cancelled effective as of the expiration of the option exchange, and immediately thereafter, in exchange therefor, the Company granted new options with an exercise price of $5.88 per share (representing the per share closing price of its common stock on October 30, 2009, as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market) to purchase an aggregate of 3,329,036 shares of common stock under the 2004 Plan.  New options have a contractual term of five years, based on the weighted average remaining contractual term of options eligible for exchange as determined at the tender offer date and generally will vest over a three-year period from the date of grant, with one-third of the shares vesting on the one-year anniversary of the grant date and the remaining shares vesting monthly for the 24 months thereafter.  The fair value of the new options granted was measured as the total of the unrecognized compensation cost of the original options tendered and the incremental compensation cost of the new options granted. The incremental compensation cost of the new options granted was measured as the excess of the fair value of the new options granted over the fair value of the original options immediately before cancellation.  The total remaining unrecognized compensation expense related to the original options will be recognized over the remaining requisite service period of the original options while the incremental compensation cost of the new options granted will be recognized over the three years service period.

As a result of the option exchange, the total incremental compensation expense of the new options is approximately $1.8 million, of which $0.2 million was recognized in the third quarter of fiscal 2010.



Equity Incentive Programs

The Company currently issues awards under three equity-based plans in order to provide additional incentive and retention to directors and employees who are considered to be essential to the long-range success of the Company.  These plans are further described below.

1994 Stock Option Plan (1994 Plan)

In May 1994, the Company’s stockholders approved the 1994 Plan.  In September 2000, the Company’s stockholders elected to extend the plan to expire on July 26, 2010.  Under the 1994 Plan, 13,500,000 shares of common stock have been made available for issuance as stock options to employees, officers, directors, consultants, independent contractors and advisors of the Company and its affiliates.  Shares issuable upon exercise of stock options granted pursuant to the Company’s 1985 Incentive and Nonqualified Stock Option Plan that expire or become un-exercisable for any reason without having been exercised in full are also available for issurance under the 1994 Plan (not to exceed 10,000,000 shares).  Options granted by the Company under the 1994 Plan generally expire seven years from the date of grant and generally vest over a four-year period from the date of grant.  The exercise price of the options granted by the Company under the 1994 Plan shall not be less than 100% of the fair market value for a common share subject to such option on the date the option is granted.  As of December 27, 2009, 1,031,031 shares remain available for future grant under the 1994 Plan.

2004 Equity Plan (2004 Plan)

In September 2004, the Company’s stockholders approved the 2004 Plan.  Under the 2004 Plan, 28,500,000 shares of common stock have been made available for issuance as stock options, restricted stock awards, stock appreciation rights, performance awards, restricted stock unit awards, and stock-based awards to employees, directors and consultants, of which a maximum of 4,000,000 shares are eligible for non-option “full value” awards.  The 2004 Plan allows for time-based and performance-based vesting for the awards.  Options granted by the Company under the 2004 Plan generally expire seven years from the date of grant and generally vest over a four-year period from the date of grant, with one-quarter of the shares of common stock vesting on the one-year anniversary of the grant date and the remaining shares vesting monthly for the 36 months thereafter.  The exercise price of the options granted by the Company under the 2004 Plan shall not be less than 100% of the fair market value for a common share subject to such option on the date the option is granted.  Full value awards made under the 2004 Plan shall become vested over a period of not less than three years (or, if vesting is performance-based, over a period of not less than one year) following the date such award is made; provided, however, that full value awards that result in the issuance of an aggregate of up to 5% of common stock available for issuance under the 2004 Plan may be granted to any one or more participants without respect to such minimum vesting provisions.  As of December 27, 2009, 8,580,383 shares remain available for future grant under the 2004 Plan.

Restricted stock units available for grant by the Company under the 2004 Plan generally vest over a 48-month period from the grant date.  Prior to vesting, participants holding restricted stock units do not have shareholder rights.  Shares are issued on or as soon as administratively practicable following the vesting date of the restricted stock units and upon issuance, recordation and delivery, the participant will have all the rights of a shareholder of the Company with respect to voting such stock and receipt of dividends and distributions on such stock.  As of December 27, 2009, 1,825,251 restricted stock unit awards were outstanding under the 2004 Plan.



The following table summarizes the Company’s stock option activities for the nine months ended December 27, 2009:

         
(in thousands)
 
 
Shares
 
Weighted Average Exercise Price
 
Options outstanding as of March 29, 2009
27,544
 
$
12.30
 
Granted
7,882
   
6.24
 
Exercised
(5)
   
3.65
 
Canceled, forfeited or expired
(12,050)
   
12.98
 
Options outstanding as of December 27, 2009
23,371
 
$
9.91
 
Options exercisable at December 27, 2009
14,448
 
$
12.07
 

As of December 27, 2009, the weighted average remaining contractual life of options outstanding was 3.2 years and the aggregate intrinsic value was $6.1million.  The weighted average remaining contractual life of options exercisable was 1.8 years and the aggregate intrinsic value was $0.4 million.  Unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock-based awards, net of estimated forfeitures was $9.6 million and will be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.0 years.
 
 
As of December 27, 2009, stock options vested and expected to vest totaled approximately 21.8 million shares, with a weighted-average exercise price of $10.18 per share and a weighted average remaining contractual life of 3.1 years.  The aggregate intrinsic value was approximately $5.0 million.

 The following table summarizes the Company’s restricted stock unit activities for the nine months ended December 27, 2009:

(in thousands)
 
Shares
   
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value
 
RSU’s outstanding as of March 29, 2009
    1,238     $ 12.09  
Granted
    1,097       5.30  
Released
    (316 )     12.59  
Forfeited
    (194 )     9.61  
Outstanding at December 27, 2009
    1,825     $ 8.19  

As of December 27, 2009, there was approximately $5.8 million of unrecognized compensation cost related to restricted stock units granted under the Company’s equity incentive plans.  The unrecognized compensation cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.6 years.

2009 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (2009 ESPP)

On June 18, 2009, the Board approved implementation of the 2009 ESPP and authorized the reservation and issuance of up to 9,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock under the 2009 ESPP, subject to stockholder approval. On September 17, 2009, the Company’s stockholders approved the plan at the 2009 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.  The 2009 ESPP is intended to be implemented in successive quarterly purchase periods commencing on the first day of each fiscal quarter of the Company.  In order to maintain its qualified status under Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code, the 2009 ESPP imposes certain restrictions, including the limitation that no employee is permitted to participate in the 2009 ESPP if the rights of such employee to purchase common stock of the Company under the 2009 ESPP and all similar purchase plans of the Company or its subsidiaries would accrue at a rate which exceeds $25,000 of the fair market value of such stock (determined at the time the right is granted) for each


calendar year.  During the nine months ended December 27, 2009, the Company issued 0.9 million shares of common stock with a weighted-average purchase price of $5.25 per share under the 2009 ESPP.

Note 6
Balance Sheet Detail

(in thousands)
 
Inventories
 
December 27,
2009
   
March 29,
2009
 
Raw materials
  $ 3,305     $ 6,876  
Work-in-process
    25,270       35,252  
Finished goods
    20,768       27,594  
   Total inventories
  $ 49,343     $ 69,722  
                 
Property, plant and equipment, net
               
Land
  $ 15,598     $ 14,533  
Machinery and equipment
    773,886       796,387  
Building and leasehold improvement
    134,491       134,358  
      923,975       945,278  
Less: accumulated deprecation
    (854,568 )     (873,717 )
   Total property, plant and equipment, net
  $ 69,407     $ 71,561  
                 
Other accrued liabilities
               
Short-term portion of supplier obligations
    6,833       2,279  
Short-term portion of restructuring liability
    3,018       3,334  
Accrued audit and legal fees
    1,483       1,469  
Short-term portion of fair market value of the supply agreement entered into with Netlogic
    1,414       --  
Accrued royalties
    1,404       1,158  
Accrued medical expenses
    1,136       1,226  
Accrued sales representative commissions
    1,033       1,333  
Other accrued liabilities
    11,326       10,407  
   Total other accrued liabilities
  $ 27,647     $ 21,206  
                 
Other long-term obligations
               
Deferred compensation related liabilities
  $ 14,340     $ 10,946  
Long-term portion of restructuring liability
    5,754       890  
Long-term portion of supplier obligations
    4,132       1,384  
Long-term portion of fair market value of the supply agreement entered into with Netlogic
    1,098       --  
Long-term portion of deferred gain on equipment sales
    232       940  
Other
    222       154  
   Total other long-term obligations
  $ 25,778     $ 14,314  



Note 7
Deferred Income on Shipments to Distributors

Included in the caption “Deferred income on shipments to distributors” on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets are amounts related to shipments to certain distributors for which revenue is not recognized until the Company’s product has been sold by the distributor to an end customer. The components at December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009 were as follows:

(in thousands)
 
December 27,
2009
   
March 29, 2009
 
Gross deferred revenue
  $ 24,742     $ 21,302  
Gross deferred costs
    5,237       4,764  
Deferred income on shipments to distributors
  $ 19,505     $ 16,538  

The gross deferred revenue represents the gross value of shipments to distributors at the list price billed to the distributor less any price protection credits provided to them in connection with reductions in list price while the products remain in their inventory.  The amount ultimately recognized as revenue will be lower than this amount as a result of future price protection and ship from stock pricing credits which are issued in connection with the sell through of the Company’s products to end customers. Historically this amount has represented an average of approximately 25% of the list price billed to the customer. The gross deferred costs represent the standard costs, which approximate actual costs of products, the Company sells to the distributors.  Although the Company monitors the levels and quality of inventory in the distribution channel, the experience is that product returned from these distributors are able to be sold to a different distributor or in a different region of the world.  As such, inventory write-downs for product in the distribution channel have not been significant.

Note 8
Fair Value Measurement

Effective March 31, 2009, the Company adopted the authoritative guidance for fair value measurement, which defines fair value as the price that would be received from selling an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that should be determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing assets or liabilities.  When determining the fair value measurements for assets and liabilities required or permitted to be recorded at fair value, the Company considers the principal or most advantageous market in which it would transact.

Fair Value Hierarchy

The authoritative guidance for fair value measurement establishes a fair value hierarchy that requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value from market based assumptions to entity specific assumptions are as follows:

Level 1: Inputs based on quoted market prices for identical assets or liabilities in active markets at the measure date.

Level 2: Observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.

Level 3: Inputs reflect management’s best estimate of what market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date.  The inputs are unobservable in the market and significant to the instrument’s valuation.


The following table summarizes the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of December 27, 2009:

   
Fair Value at Reporting Date Using:
 
(in thousands)
 
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Total Balance
 
Cash Equivalents and Short Term Investments:
                 
Money market funds
  $ 97,361       --     $ 97,361  
US government treasuries and agencies securities
    96,559       --       96,559  
Corporate bonds
    --       70,619       70,619  
Corporate commercial paper
    --       31,185       31,185  
Bank deposits
    --       2,700       2,700  
Other Assets:
                       
Assets related to non-qualified deferred compensation plan
    --       12,418       12,418  
Total assets measured at fair value
  $ 193,920     $ 116,922     $ 310,842  
Liabilities:
                       
Non-qualified deferred compensation obligations
    --       14,340       14,340  
    $ --     $ 14,340     $ 14,340  

The following table summarizes the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 29, 2009:

   
Fair Value at Reporting Date Using:
 
(in thousands)
 
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Total Balance
 
Cash Equivalents and Short Term Investments:
                 
Money market funds
  $ 75,531       --     $ 75,531  
US government treasuries and agencies securities
    108,935       --       108,935  
Corporate bonds
    --       47,436       47,436  
Corporate commercial paper
    --       39,637       39,637  
Bank deposits
    --       10,110       10,110  
Municipal bonds
    --       1,056       1,056  
Asset-backed securities
    --       146       146  
Other Assets:
                       
Assets related to non-qualified deferred compensation plan
    --       9,668       9,668  
Total assets measured at fair value
  $ 184,466     $ 108,053     $ 292,519  
Liabilities:
                       
Non-qualified deferred compensation obligations
    --       10,946       10,946  
Total liabilities measured at fair value
  $ --     $ 10,946     $ 10,946  

The Company’s cash equivalents and short term investments are classified within Level 1 or Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices, broker or dealer quotation, spot rates or alternative pricing sources with reasonable levels of price transparency.  The securities in Level 1 are highly liquid and actively traded in exchange markets or over-the-counter markets. The securities in Level 2 represent securities with quoted prices in markets that are not as active or for which all significant inputs are observable.


The Company maintains an unfunded deferred compensation plan to provide benefits to executive officers and other key employees.  Under the plan, participants can defer any portion of their salary and bonus compensation into the plan and may choose from a portfolio of funds from which earnings are measured.  Participant balances are always 100% vested.   The deferred compensation plan obligation is recorded at fair value based on the quoted prices of the underlying mutual funds and included in other long-term obligations on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Increases or decreases related to the obligations are recorded in operating expenses.  Additionally, the Company has set aside assets in a separate trust that is invested in corporate owned life insurance intended to substantially offset the liability under the plan.  The Company has identified both its assets and liability related to the plan within Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy as these valuations are based on observable market data obtained directly from the dealer or observable price quotes for similar assets such as the underlying mutual fund pricing.

Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase. The Company maintains its cash and cash equivalents with reputable major financial institutions.  Deposits with these banks may exceed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insurance limits or similar limits in foreign jurisdictions. These deposits typically may be redeemed upon demand and, therefore, bear minimal risk.  While the Company monitors daily the cash balances in its operating accounts and adjusts the balances as appropriate, these balances could be impacted if one or more of the financial institutions with which the Company deposits fails or is subject to other adverse conditions in the financial markets.  As of December 27, 2009, the Company has not experienced any losses in its operating accounts.

All of the Company’s available-for-sale investments are subject to a periodic impairment review. Investments are considered to be impaired when a decline in fair value is judged to be other-than-temporary. This determination requires significant judgment. For publicly traded investments, impairment is determined based upon the specific facts and circumstances present at the time, including a review of the closing price over the length of time, general market conditions and the Company’s intent and ability to hold the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for recovery. Although the Company believes its portfolio continues to be comprised of sound investments due to high credit ratings and government guarantees of the underlying investments, a further decline in the capital and financial markets would adversely impact the market values of its investments and their liquidity. The Company continually monitors the credit risk in its portfolio and future developments in the credit markets and makes appropriate changes to its investment policy as deemed necessary.  The Company did not record any impairment charges related to its short-term investments in the three and nine months ended December 27, 2009.

Note 9
Investments

Available for Sale Securities

Available-for-sale investments at December 27, 2009 were as follows:

 
(in thousands)
 
 
Cost
   
Gross Unrealized Gains
   
Gross Unrealized Losses
   
Estimated Fair Value
 
Money market funds
  $ 97,361     $ --     $ --     $ 97,361  
U.S. government treasuries and agency securities
    96,414       148       (3 )     96,559  
Corporate bonds
    70,292       336       (9 )     70,619  
Corporate commercial paper
    31,185       --       --       31,185  
Bank deposits
    2,700       --       --       2,700  
Total available-for-sale investments
    297,952       484       (12 )     298,424  
Less amounts classified as cash equivalents
    (108,367 )     --       --       (108,367 )
   Short-term investments
  $ 189,585     $ 484     $ (12 )   $ 190,057  



Available-for-sale investments at March 29, 2009 were as follows:

 
(in thousands)
 
 
Cost
   
Gross Unrealized Gains
   
Gross Unrealized Losses
   
Estimated Fair Value
 
Money market funds
  $ 75,531       --       --     $ 75,531  
U.S. government treasuries and agency securities
     108,528     $ 445     $ (38 )      108,935  
Corporate bonds
    47,452       102       (118 )     47,436  
Corporate commercial paper
    39,634       3       --       39,637  
Bank deposits
    10,110       --       --       10,110  
Municipal bonds
    1,027       29       --       1,056  
Asset-backed securities
    145       1       --       146  
Total available-for-sale investments
    282,427       580       (156 )     282,851  
Less amounts classified as cash equivalents
    (122,818 )     (1 )     5       (122,814 )
   Short-term investments
  $ 159,609     $ 579     $ (151 )   $ 160,037  

The amortized cost and estimated fair value of available-for-sale debt securities at December 27, 2009, by contractual maturity, were as follows:

(in thousands)
 
Amortized Cost
   
Estimated Fair Value
 
Due in 1 year or less
  $ 275,257     $ 275,535  
Due in 1-2 years
    20,292       20,487  
Due in 2-5 years
    2,402       2,402  
Total investments in available-for-sale debt securities
  $ 297,951     $ 298,424  

The following table shows the gross unrealized losses and fair value of the Company’s investments with unrealized losses as of December 27, 2009, aggregated by length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous loss position.

   
Less than 12 months
   
12 months or Greater
   
Total
 
 
(in thousands)
 
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
   
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
   
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
 
Corporate bonds
  $ 16,981     $ (9 )   $ --     $ --     $ 16,981     $ (9 )
U.S. government treasuries and agency securities
    2,000       (3 )     --       --       2,000       (3 )
Total
  $ 18,981     $ (12 )   $ --     $ --     $ 18,981     $ (12 )

The following table shows the gross unrealized losses and fair value of the Company’s investments with unrealized losses as of March 29, 2009, aggregated by length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous loss position.

   
Less than 12 months
   
12 months or Greater
   
Total
 
 
(in thousands)
 
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
   
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
   
Fair Value
   
Unrealized Loss
 
Corporate bonds
  $ 28,629     $ (105 )   $ 795     $ (13 )   $ 29,424     $ (118 )
U.S. government treasuries and agency securities
    19,212       (38 )     --       --       19,212       (38 )
Total
  $ 47,841     $ (143 )   $ 795     $ (13 )   $ 48,636     $ (156 )

Currently, a significant portion of its available-for-sale investments that the Company holds are all high grade instruments.  As of December 27, 2009, the unrealized losses on the Company’s available-for-sale


investments represented an insignificant amount in relation to its total available-for-sale portfolio. Substantially all of the Company’s unrealized losses on our available-for-sale marketable debt instruments can be attributed to fair value fluctuations in an unstable credit environment that resulted in a decrease in the market liquidity for debt instruments.  Because the Company has the ability to hold these investments until a recovery of fair value, which may be maturity, the Company did not consider these investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired at December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009.

Trading Securities

Trading securities are stated at fair value, with gains or losses resulting from changes in fair value recognized currently in non-operating earnings. As of December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009, the deferred compensation plan assets were approximately $12.4 million and $9.7 million, which were included in other assets in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The Company recorded net gains of $2.3 million during the first nine months of fiscal 2010 and net loss of $2.9 million during the first nine months of fiscal 2009 in interest income and other (expense), net in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Non-Marketable Equity Securities

In conjunction with the merger with Integrated Circuit Systems, Inc. (ICS), the Company acquired an investment in Best Elite International Limited (“Best Elite”). Best Elite is a private company, which owns a wafer fabrication facility in Suzhou, China.  The Company purchases wafers from Best Elite’s wafer fabrication facility for certain legacy ICS products.  In accordance with authoritative guidance for the equity method of accounting for investment in common stock, the Company accounts for this investment under the cost method. This investment is subject to periodic impairment review.  In determining whether a decline in value of its investment in Best Elite has occurred and is other than temporary, an assessment was made by considering available evidence, including the general market conditions in the wafer fabrication industry, Best Elite’s financial condition, near-term prospects, market comparables and subsequent rounds of financing.   The valuation also takes into account the Best Elite’s capital structure, liquidation preferences for its capital and other economic variables. The valuation methodology for determining the decline in value of non-marketable equity securities is based on inputs that require management judgment. The carrying value of the Company’s investment in Best Elite was approximately $2.0 million and is classified within other assets on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009.

Note 10
Derivative Financial Instruments

As a result of its international operations, sales and purchase transactions, the Company is subject to risks associated with fluctuating currency exchange rates. The Company may use derivative financial instruments to hedge these risks when instruments are available and cost effective in an attempt to minimize the impact of currency exchange rate movements on its operating results and on the cost of capital equipment purchases.  The Company may enter into hedges of forecasted transactions when the underlying transaction is highly probable and reasonably certain to occur within the subsequent twelve months. Examples of these exposures would include forecasted expenses of a foreign manufacturing plant, design center or sales office. The Company may additionally enter into a derivative to hedge the foreign currency risk of a capital equipment purchase if the capital equipment purchase order is executed and designated as a firm commitment.

The Company may also utilize currency forward contracts to hedge currency exchange rate fluctuations related to certain short term foreign currency assets and liabilities. As of December 27, 2009 and March 29, 2009, the Company did not have any outstanding foreign currency contracts that were designated as hedges of forecasted cash flows or capital equipment purchases.  The Company does not enter into derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes.


Gains and losses on these undesignated derivatives substantially offset gains and losses on the assets and liabilities being hedged and the net amount is included in interest income and other (expense), net in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. The Company did not have any outstanding foreign currency contracts that were designated as hedges of certain short term foreign currency assets and liabilities at the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2010.  An immaterial amount of net gains and losses were included in interest income and other (expense), net during the first nine months of fiscal 2010 and 2009.

Besides foreign exchange rate exposure, the Company’s cash and investment portfolios are subject to risks associated with fluctuations in interest rates.  While the Company’s policies allow for the use of derivative financial instruments to hedge the fair values of such investments, the Company has yet to enter into this type of hedging arrangement.

Note 11
Business Combinations

Acquisition of Tundra Semiconductor Corporation (“Tundra”)

On June 29, 2009, the Company completed its acquisition of Tundra, pursuant to which the Company acquired 100% of the voting common stock of Tundra at a price of CDN$6.25 per share, or an aggregate purchase price of approximately CDN$120.8 million.  The Company paid approximately $104.3 million in cash. In addition, as part of the consideration in the acquisition, IDT assumed options to purchase up to 0.8 million shares of IDT common stock. As a result, the acquisition resulted in the issuance of approximately 0.8 million stock options with a fair value of $0.7 million.  The total consideration was approximately $105.0 million.  The options were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Approximately $3.4 million of acquisition-related costs were included in the selling, general and administrative expenses on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the nine months ended December 27, 2009.

(in thousands)
 
     
Cash paid
  $ 104,316  
Assumed stock options
    721  
Total purchase price
  $ 105,037  
 

 
In accordance with authoritative guidance for business combinations, the Company has allocated the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed, based on their estimated fair values. The excess purchase price over those fair values is recorded as goodwill. Tundra’s technology and development capabilities are complementary to the Company’s existing product portfolios for RapidIO and PCI Express.  The Company expects that this strategic combination will provide customers with a broader product offering as well as improved service, support and a future roadmap for serial connectivity.   These are significant contributing factors to the establishment of the purchase price, resulting in the recognition of goodwill.  The fair values assigned to tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed are based on management’s estimates and assumptions.  Goodwill is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes. Goodwill is not amortized but will be reviewed at least annually for impairment. Purchased intangibles with finite lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives on a straight line basis.



The purchase price has been allocated as follows:

(in thousands)
 
 
Fair Value
 
Identifiable tangible assets acquired
     
   Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 46,085  
   Accounts receivable
    1,260  
   Inventories
    19,881  
   Prepayments and other current assets
    6,119  
   Property, plant and equipment, net
    7,692  
   Other assets
    4,025  
   Accounts payable and accruals
    (11,877 )
   Other long-term obligations
    (3,549 )
Net identifiable tangible assets acquired
    69,636  
Amortizable intangible assets
    19,979  
Goodwill
    15,422  
Total purchase price
  $ 105,037  

A summary of the allocation of amortizable intangible assets is as follows:

   
Fair Value
(in thousands)
 
Amortizable intangible assets:
     
    Existing technologies
  $ 8,476  
    Customer relationships
    7,973  
    Trade name
    2,911  
    In-process research and development (IPR&D)
    619  
Total
  $ 19,979  
 
Useful lives are primarily based on the underlying assumptions used in the discounted cash flow (“DCF”) models.

Identifiable Tangible Assets

Tundra’s assets and liabilities were reviewed and adjusted, if required, to their estimated fair value.
 
Inventories – The value allocated to inventories reflects the estimated fair value of the acquired inventory based on the expected sales price of the inventory, less reasonable selling margin.
 
Property, plant and equipment – The fair value was determined under the continued use premise as the assets were valued as part of a going concern.  This premise assumes that the assets will remain “as-is, where is” and continue to be used at their present location for the continuation of business operations.  Value in use includes all direct and indirect costs necessary to acquire, install, fabricated and make the assets operational.  The fair value was estimated using a cost approach methodology.

Amortizable Intangible Assets
 
Existing technology consists of products that have reached technological feasibility. The Company valued the existing technology utilizing a DCF model, which uses forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible asset.  The Company utilized discount factors of 20% - 22% for the existing technology and is amortizing the intangible assets over 5 years on a straight-line basis.
 
Customer relationship values have been estimated utilizing a DCF model, which uses forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible asset.   The Company utilized discount factors of 20%-22% for each of these intangible assets and is amortizing the intangible assets over 5 years on a straight-line basis.

 
The Tundra trade name value was determined using the relief from royalty method, which represents the benefit of owning this intangible asset rather than paying royalties for its use.  The Company utilized a discount rate of 20% for the trade name and is amortizing this intangible asset over 7 years on a straight-line basis.
 
Projects that qualify as IPR&D represent those at the development stage and require further research and development to determine technical feasibility and commercial viability. Technological feasibility is established when an enterprise has completed all planning, designing, coding, and testing activities that are necessary to establish that a product can be produced to meet its design specifications, including functions, features, and technical performance requirements. The value of IPR&D was determined by considering the importance of each project to the Company’s overall development plan, estimating costs to develop the purchased IPR&D into commercially viable products, estimating the resulting net cash flows from the projects when completed and discounting the net cash flows to their present value based on the percentage of completion of the IPR&D projects. The Company utilized the DCF method to value the IPR&D, using a discount factor of 22-24% and will amortize this intangible asset once the projects are complete. There were two IPR&D projects underway at Tundra at the acquisition date. As of December 27, 2009, one of the projects was 100% complete and another project was 95% complete.  Approximately $4.7 million costs were incurred in connection with both projects. The Company estimates that an additional investment of $0.3 million will be required to complete the project with an estimated completion date during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010.

Pro Forma Financial Information (unaudited)

The following unaudited pro forma financial information presents the combined results of operations of the Company and Tundra as if the acquisition had occurred as of the beginning of fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009. The unaudited pro forma financial information is presented for informational purposes only and is not indicative of the results of operations that would have been achieved if the acquisition had been taken place at the beginning of fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009.  The unaudited pro forma financial information presented below combines the historical IDT and historical Tundra results for the nine months ended December 27, 2009 and December 28, 2008, respectively, and includes the business combination effect of the amortization charges from acquired intangible assets, the fair value adjustment to acquired inventory sold, adjustments to interest income and related tax effects.

   
Nine months ended
 
(Unaudited)
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
Dec. 27,
 2009
   
Dec. 28,
 2008
 
Supplement pro forma
           
Tundra’s net revenues (6/29/09 through 12/27/09)
    18,909       --  
Tundra’s net income (6/29/09 through 12/27/09)
    7,705       --  
Net revenues (1)
  $ 408,178     $ 604,349  
Net income (loss) (1)
    34,446       (322,748
Basic income (loss) per share
  $ 0.21     $ (1.91 )
Diluted income (loss) per share
  $ 0.21     $ (1.91 )

(1) Supplement pro forma information includes Tundra’s financial results for the periods March 30, 2009 through June 28, 2009 and March 24, 2008 through December 28, 2008, respectively.
 
Acquisition of certain assets of Leadis Technology, Inc. (“Leadis”)

On June 10, 2009, the Company completed its acquisition of certain sensor technology and related assets from Leadis, along with members of Leadis’ engineering team. The total purchase price of approximately $6.3 million was paid in cash. Approximately $ 0.2 million of acquisition-related costs was included in the selling, general and administrative expenses on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the nine months ended December 27, 2009.


In accordance with authoritative guidance for the business combinations, the Company has allocated the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed, based on their estimated fair values. The excess purchase price over those fair values is recorded as goodwill. The acquisition provided the Company with a touch sensor technology, team of engineers, certain assets and a product line involving touch sensor technology. The Company believes these technologies will allow it to address a broader range of multimedia applications with highly integrated processing, interfacing and connectivity solutions. This transaction is intended to enable the Company to provide OEMs and original design manufactures (ODMs) with lower power, higher functionality Application-Specific Standard Products (ASSPs) that will enable them to provide consumers with a richer, more complete digital media experience. These opportunities, along with the ability to sell touch sensor products to the existing base of the Company’s customers, were significant contributing factors to the establishment of the purchase price. The fair values assigned to tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed are based on management estimates and assumptions. The goodwill as a result of this acquisition is expected to be deductible for tax purposes over 15 years. Goodwill is not amortized but will be reviewed at least annually for impairment. Purchased intangibles with finite lives are being amortized over their respective estimated useful lives on a straight line basis.

The purchase price has been allocated as follows:

(in thousands)
 
 
Fair Value
 
Net tangible assets acquired
  $ 151  
Amortizable intangible assets
    6,040  
Goodwill
    59  
Total purchase price
  $ 6,250  

A summary of the allocation of amortizable intangible assets is as follows:

 
(in thousands)
 
Fair Value
 
Amortizable intangible assets:
     
    Existing technologies
  $ 4,670  
    Customer relationships
    1,092  
    In-process research and development (IPR&D)
    278  
Total
  $ 6,040  
 
Useful lives are primarily based on the underlying assumptions used in the DCF models.
 
Net Tangible Assets
 
Assets were reviewed and adjusted, if required, to their estimated fair value.

Amortizable Intangible Assets
 
Existing technologies consists of products that have reached technological feasibility. The Company valued the existing technologies utilizing a DCF model, which used forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible assets. The Company utilized discount factors of 42% and 44% for existing technologies and is amortizing the intangible assets on a straight-line basis over 7 years.
 
The value of the customer relationships intangible asset was estimated using a DCF model, which used forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible assets. The Company utilized discount factors of 42% - 45% and is amortizing this intangible asset on a straight-line basis over 5 years.
 
Projects that qualify as IPR&D represent those at the development stage and require further research and development to determine technical feasibility and commercial viability. Technological feasibility is established when an enterprise has completed all planning, designing, coding, and testing activities that are necessary to establish that a product can be produced to meet its design specifications, including functions,


features, and technical performance requirements. The value of IPR&D was determined by considering the importance of each project to the Company’s overall development plan, estimating costs to develop the purchased IPR&D into commercially viable products, estimating the resulting net cash flows from the projects when completed and discounting the net cash flows to their present value based on the percentage of completion of the IPR&D projects. The Company utilized the DCF method to value the IPR&D, using discount factors of 45% and 46% and will amortize this intangible asset once the projects are complete. There were two IPR&D projects underway at Leadis at the acquisition date.  As of December 27, 2009, the projects were 39% and 30% complete and approximately $0.6 million and $1.1 million costs were incurred. The Company estimates that additional investment of $1.0 million and $2.6 million will be required to complete the projects with estimated completion dates during the second and fourth quarter of fiscal 2011.

Leadis acquisition related financial results have been included in the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations from the closing date of the acquisition on June 28, 2009. Pro forma earnings information has not been presented because the effect of the acquisition is not material to the Company’s historical financials results.
 
Acquisition of certain assets of Silicon Optix

On October 20, 2008, the Company completed its acquisition of certain video signal processing technology and related assets along with members of the Silicon Optix’s engineering teams. The total purchase price was approximately $20.1 million, including approximately $0.7 million of acquisition-related transaction costs.  A summary of the total purchase price is as follows:

(in thousands)
 
     
Cash paid
  $ 19,406  
Acquisition-related transaction costs
    691  
Total purchase price
  $ 20,097  

In accordance with authoritative guidance for the business combinations, the Company has allocated the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed, including in-process research and development, based on their estimated fair values. The excess purchase price over those fair values is recorded as goodwill. The acquisition provided the Company with a video signal processing technology, team of engineers, certain assets and a product line involving video technologies. The Company believes these technologies will allow it to pursue expanded opportunities, particularly in the emerging high-definition video market. These opportunities, along with the ability to sell video products to the existing base of IDT customers, were significant contributing factors to the establishment of the purchase price. The fair values assigned to tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed are based on management estimates and assumptions. As of December 27, 2009, approximately $0.9 million of the total goodwill is expected to be deductible for tax purposes over 15 years. Goodwill is not amortized but will be reviewed at least annually for impairment. Purchased intangibles with finite lives are being amortized over their respective estimated useful lives on a straight line basis. The purchase price has been allocated as follows:

(in thousands)
 
 
Fair Value
 
Net tangible assets acquired
  $ 537  
Amortizable intangible assets
    4,746  
IPR&D
    5,597  
Goodwill
    9,217  
Total purchase price
  $ 20,097  



A summary of the allocation of amortizable intangible assets is as follows:

(in thousands)
 
 
Fair Value
 
Amortizable intangible assets:
     
    Existing technologies
  $ 3,654  
    Customer relationships
    582  
    Trade name
    510  
Total
  $ 4,746  
 
Useful lives are primarily based on the underlying assumptions used in the DCF models.
 
Net Tangible Assets
 
Assets were reviewed and adjusted, if required, to their estimated fair value.

Amortizable Intangible Assets
 
Existing technologies consists of products that have reached technological feasibility. The Company valued the existing technologies utilizing a DCF model, which used forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible assets. The Company utilized discount factors of 24% and 32% for existing technologies and is amortizing the intangible assets on a straight-line basis over 3 to 7 years.
 
The value of the customer relationships intangible asset was estimated using a DCF model, which used forecasts of future revenues and expenses related to the intangible assets. The Company utilized a discount factor of 24% and is amortizing this intangible asset on a straight-line basis over 3 years.
 
The Silicon Optix’s trade names were valued using the relief from royalty method, which represents the benefit of owning this intangible asset rather than paying royalties for its use. The Company utilized a discount factor of 27% and is amortizing this intangible asset on a straight-line basis over 7 years.

IPR&D
 
Of the total purchase price, $5.6 million was allocated to IPR&D. Projects that qualify as IPR&D represent those that have not yet reached technological feasibility and which have no alternative future use. Technological feasibility is established when an enterprise has completed all planning, designing, coding, and testing activities that are necessary to establish that a product can be produced to meet its design specifications, including functions, features, and technical performance requirements. The value of IPR&D was determined by considering the importance of each project to the Company’s overall development plan, estimating costs to develop the purchased IPR&D into commercially viable products, estimating the resulting net cash flows from the projects when completed and discounting the net cash flows to their present value based on the percentage of completion of the IPR&D projects. The Company utilized the DCF method to value the IPR&D, using a discount factor of 32%. There was one IPR&D project underway at Silicon Optix at the acquistion date.  As of December 27, 2009, the project was 95% complete and approximately $7.7 million cost was incurred. The Company estimates that additional investment of $1.3 million will be required to complete the project with estimated completion date during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010.

Note 12
Divestiture

Military business

On November 30, 2009, the Company completed the sale of certain assets and transferred certain liabilities related to its military business to Spectrum Control, Inc ("Spectrum Control") for approximately $12.8 million. As a result, in the third quarter of fiscal 2010,
the Company recorded a loss of $4.3 million related to the divestiture. All employees in the Company’s military business were transferred to Spectrum Control as a result of the transaction. In addition, the Company also signed a sublease agreement with Spectrum Control.  The sublease will expire in May, 2010.  Prior to the divestiture, the military business was part of a larger cash-flow generating product group and did not, on its own, represent a separate operation of the Company, as such discontinued operations reporting does not apply.

The following table summarizes the components of the loss:

(in thousands)
     
Cash proceeds from sale
  $ 12,800  
Assets sold to Spectrum Control
       
   Accounts receivable, net
    (1,022 )
   Inventory, net
    (5,027 )
   Fixed Assets, net
    (982 )
   Intangible assets, net
    (9,517 )
   Other assets
    (46 )
 Liabilities assumed by Spectrum Control
    572  
Transaction and other costs
    (1,051 )
Loss on divestiture
  $ (4,273 )

Silicon logic engineering business

On December 4, 2009, the Company completed the sale of certain assets and transferred certain liabilities related to its Silicon Logic Engineering business to Open Silicon, Inc (“OSI’) for $1 in cash. In the third quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company recorded a loss of $0.2 million related to the divestiture. In connection with the divestiture, the Company entered into a design service agreement with OSI whereby they agreed to provide and the Company agreed to purchase design services from OSI through the end of calendar year 2010. The total commitment under this design service agreement is $0.8 million. The Company also signed a sublease agreement with OSI.  The sublease will expire in June 2012. The sale of the SLE business was not qualified as discontinued operations as the Company will continue to have cash flows associated with design service agreement that the Company signed with OSI.

The following table summarizes the components of the loss:

(in thousands)
     
Cash proceeds from sale
  $ -  
Assets sold to OSI
       
   Fixed Assets, net
    (120 )
   Other assets
    (24 )
 Liabilities assumed by Spectrum Control
    17  
Transaction and other costs
    (61 )
Loss on divestiture
  $ (188 )

Network search engine business

On July 17, 2009, the Company completed the sale of certain assets related to its network search engine business (the "NWD assets") to NetLogic Microsystems, Inc ("Netlogic"), pursuant to an Asset Purchase Agreement by and between the Company and NetLogic dated April 30, 2009. Upon closing of the transaction, NetLogic paid the Company $100 million in cash consideration, which included inventory valued at approximately $10 million, subject to adjustment.  As of September 27, 2009, the inventory we sold to Netlogic was valued at $8.2 million.  Subsequently,  in the third quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company reimbursed Netlogic the excess cash for the inventory in the amount of $1.8 million.  The Company’s NWD assets are part of the
 
Communications reportable segment. In connection with the divestiture, the Company entered into a supply agreement with NetLogic whereby they agreed to buy and the Company agreed to sell Netlogic certain network search engine products for a limited time following the closing of the sale.  According to the terms set forth in the agreement, the Company has committed to supply certain products either at its standard costs or below its normal gross margins for such products, which are lower than their estimated fair values. As a result, the Company recorded $3.0 million related to the estimated fair value of this agreement, of which $0.5 million were recognized as revenue in the first nine months of fiscal 2010. The Company expects to complete sales under this agreement within 2 years.  In the second quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company recorded a gain of $82.7 million. The sale of the NWD business was not qualified as discontinued operations as the Company will continue to have cash flows associated with the supply agreement that the Company signed with Netlogic.

The following table summarizes the components of the gain:

(in thousands)
     
Cash proceeds from sale
  $ 98,183  
Assets sold to Netlogic
       
   Net inventory sold to Netlogic
    (7,593 )
   Fixed assets and license transferred to Netlogic
    (583 )
Goodwill write off
    (3,701 )
Transaction and other costs
    (579 )
Fair market value of the supply agreement with Netlogic
    (2,980 )
Gain on divestiture
  $ 82,747  

Note 13
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

The changes in the carrying amounts of goodwill by segment for the three and nine months ended December 27, 2009 were as follows:

 
(in thousands)
 
Communications
   
Computing and Consumer
   
Total
 
Balance as of March 29, 2009
  $ 63,204     $ 26,200     $ 89,404  
Additions (1)
    --       59       59  
Balance as of June 29, 2009
    63,204       26,259       89,463  
Additions (2)
    13,321       2,142       15,463  
Adjustments (3)
    (3,701 )     --       (3,701 )
Balance as of September 27, 2009
    72,824       28,401       101,225  
Adjustments (4)
    (41 )     --       (41 )
Balance as of December 27, 2009
  $ 72,783     $ 28,401     $ 101,184  

(1)  
Additions were from the Leadis acquisition.
(2)  
Additions were from the Tundra acquisition.
(3)  
Adjustments primarily represent the write off of goodwill associated with the divestiture of networking assets. See note 12-"Divestitures" for further discussion.
(4)  
Adjustments were related to the Tundra acquisition.



Identified intangible asset balances are summarized as follows:

   
December 27, 2009
 
       
 
(in thousands)
 
Gross assets
   
Accumulated amortization
   
Net assets
 
Identified intangible assets:
                 
Existing technology
  $ 229,218     $ (196,578 )   $ 32,641  
Trademarks
    11,634       (8,502 )     3,131  
Customer relationships
    133,241       (119,030 )     14,211  
Foundry & Assembler relationships
    64,380       (64,378 )     2  
Non-compete agreements
    52,958       (52,958 )     --  
IPR&D
    897       --       897  
Other
    29,553       (29,553 )     --  
Total identified intangible assets
  $ 521,881     $ (470,999 )   $ 50,882  

   
March 29, 2009
 
       
 
(in thousands)
 
Gross assets
   
Accumulated amortization
   
Net assets
 
Identified intangible assets:
                 
Existing technology
  $ 236,423     $ (198,133 )   $ 38,290  
Trademarks
    9,360       (8,878 )     482  
Customer relationships
    138,317       (126,586 )     11,731  
Foundry & assembler relationships
    64,380       (64,374 )     6  
Non-compete agreements
    52,958       (52,958 )     --  
Other
    31,053       (31,053 )     --  
Total identified intangible assets
  $ 532,491     $ (481,982 )   $ 50,509  

Amortization expense for identified intangibles is summarized below:

   
Three months ended
   
Nine months ended
 
 (in thousands)
 
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
   
Dec. 27,
2009
   
Dec. 28,
2008
 
Existing technology
  $ 2,996     $ 13,349     $ 11,176     $ 41,441  
Trademarks
    122